skip to main content skip to footer

Adopting Kittens

Kittens 20 weeks and under are adopted in pairs ONLY - NO EXCEPTIONS!!

Why adopt kittens in pairs?

1. Learn by Observation
Kittens learn by observation and will more quickly pick up skills like using the litter box or grooming if they have another kitten or cat to teach them.

2. Healthy Development
Kittens need interaction with other kittens for healthy social development. A kitten learns a lot in the first several months of life from its mother and littermates. Separating a kitten from its mother is often a necessity for adoption purposes, but taking it away from its littermates and isolating it can delay the kitten's development emotionally, socially, and sometimes physically. Kittens who are able to remain with one of their littermates or a similarly-aged companion tend to be healthier and happier, and in the long run, better-socialized pets than those who are isolated from others of their kind at an early age.


3. Focus Play Aggression
Having a friend means they can take out their play aggression on one another (instead of on you.) They’ll also teach each other good boundaries about biting and scratching.


4. Entertained and Out of Trouble
When your kitten has a buddy, they’ll always be entertained, active, and enriched. And a happy cat makes a happy home! One mischievous kitten can be destructive if left alone, but two kittens tend to keep each other occupied and out of trouble. 

Kittens are curious and crave constant stimulation. Out of boredom, a single kitten will often entertain itself by chewing plants, climbing drapes and furniture, unrolling toilet paper, exploring electrical cords and sockets, etc. Kittens who live with other kittens may sometimes do these things as well, but if they have another kitten to tumble around and play with it is less likely they'll need to entertain themselves with behaviors like these, which can be destructive and dangerous.

Kittens are very active at night. A single kitten is likely to keep people awake at night with constant jumping, pouncing and other hunting behavior. With a companion to play with at night, this behavior is minimized because they will have each other to chase and play games with until they too fall asleep.

5. Better Companion for Another Kitten than an Adult
A single kitten is not a good companion for an older cat. Kittens have boundless energy. They want to play and run constantly which typically overwhelms and irritates an older cat. Likewise, a kitten is apt to be frustrated that its companion doesn't have its same level of energy. At the very least, this can lead to two very unhappy cats. At worst, behavior problems such as litterbox avoidance or destructive scratching can occur as one or both cats act out their frustrations on their surroundings. It's unlikely that the two will have a close, bonded relationship, even after the kitten matures, since their experiences with one another from the beginning of the relationship are likely to be negative. An older kitty is better matched with a cat closer to its own age and temperament.


6. Easier than Additional Adoptions

It’s easier to adopt a bonded pair than it is to introduce a new cat later. Adopting a dynamic duo ensures that you’ll have a harmonious home for years to come!



Sources & Other Articles that Also Agree!

Kitten Lady

IBOK Rescue

Angels Among Us Pet Rescue

Purr Partners

The Spruce Pets

Zani's Furry Friends